Tag Archive | "CO2"

Abu Dhabi to issue sustainable lighting strategies

Martin Valentine, Lighting Expert at Abu Dhabi City Municipality will preview the future sustainable lighting strategies at the Middle East Smart Lighting Summit on 11 & 12 November at Jumeirah at Etihad Towers in Abu Dhabi.

The Summit will also introduce the newly established Middle East Lighting Association that will provide support to regulatory authorities and lighting manufacturers.

A large focus on this years’ event will be on new and future lighting technology including LED, solar and smart controls.

“It’s a very important platform for the Middle East’s lighting industry with government authorities, developers, consultants and manufacturers meeting to discuss standards and regulations and the development of emerging technology like solar to meet the sustainability requirements of key importance in this region”, said Charlene Corrin of Expotrade Global, the organiser of the Middle East Smart Lighting & Energy Summit.

The Abu Dhabi Sustainable Public Lighting Strategy which is now being implemented aims to contribute to at a least 60% reduction in power usage, 75% reduction in carbon dioxide emissions and a reduction in maintenance works by 40-80% in the future.

 

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Brigdestone’s latest technologies at the motor show

Yesterday, Bridgestone Middle East and Africa, the Official Tyre of 2013 Dubai International Motor Show, presented the company’s latest technological innovations: Air Free concept tyre, the tyre with ologic technology and the Half-Weight concept tyre. The three new tyre concepts, unveiled for the first time in the region, are showcased at the Bridgestone stand in Hall 2 at Dubai International Convention and Exhibition Centre, until November 9th, 2013.

During the official press preview, Bridgestone Middle East and Africa President, Shoichi Sakuma, said: “The Bridgestone Group is committed to helping ensure a healthy environment for current and future generation; this means that we are progressively adapting our technologies and developing new products to go towards the realisation of a safer and more sustainable society. The three innovative tyre concepts that we are presenting, set a new standard in terms of environmental friendliness, safety, and comfort and are evidence of Bridgestone putting words into action.”

Air Free concept tyre is a non-pneumatic eco-friendly tyre which requires less maintenance while eliminating the worry of punctures. The structure of load-bearing spokes stretching along the inner sides of the tyre is designed not to go flat and never need inflating. Moreover the spoke structure is made from a thermoplastic resin which, along with the rubber in the tread portion, can be 100% recycled.

 ‘Ologic tyre’ is narrower and features a larger diameter than conventional tyres which helps vehicles achieve improved fuel efficiency while contributing to reductions in CO2 emissions. The tyre has a higher air pressure and is designed with a new pattern technology and compounds which allow it to have significantly lower levels of rolling resistance, while maintaining substantially higher levels of wet grip performance. This new category of tyres has been conceived specifically for electric and hybrid vehicles in an effort to support the direction taken by the automotive industry towards more eco-friendly mobility.

Half-Weight concept tyre is a solution for car manufacturers striving to reach stricter fuel consumption targets. The new concept tyre reduces the vehicle’s weight contributing to improved fuel efficiency, and by reducing the usage of resource it lowers energy requirements for manufacturing.

The world’s largest tyre and rubber company’s stand at the 2013 Dubai International Motor Show features three distinctive zones to support visitors in their journey from current to future. Along with the new tyre concepts – displayed in the future zone of the stand – the booth hosts in the current zone Bridgestone ‘s latest range of tyres.

Bridgestone will also host the ‘ Bridgestone 4D Theatre’ where visitors to the stand will also experience the performance of some of Bridgestone tyres on a simulated road trip. While seated in special moving chairs, visitors will watch a 3D movie that will be played through a head mount display and will feel like being in a real car fitted with Bridgestone tyres.

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Acid attack

New research in the waters of the Arctic reveals a growing threat unique to the cold ocean which helps protect the planet by absorbing milions of tonnes of CO2 but suffers increased acidity as a result.

Acidity is rapidly increasing in the waters of the Arctic region and poses a huge risk to the survival of marine animals. Acidity has a major effect on the rates at which corals and rocks grow or are dissolved. “A remarkable 20% of the Canadian Basin has become more corrosive to carbonate minerals in an unprecedented short period of time,” said US Geological Survey oceanographer, Lisa Robbins. “Nowhere on Earth have we documented such large scale, rapid ocean acidification.” CO2 emissions increase the acidity of the sea if it absorbs too much and that affect decreases calcification rates in many organisms. Calcifying is an important part of growth to marine organisms as it helps to build shells and skeletons.

If reduced, the organisms are most likely to dissolve into extinction. Corals, shrimps and plankton, among other marine creatures, are severely affected by this change. Any threat to them causes potential imbalance in the whole ocean food chain and the consequences are potentially devastating. “In the Arctic, where multi-year sea ice has been receding, we see that the dilution of seawater with melted sea ice adding fuel to the fire of ocean acidification,” according to co-author, and co-project chief, Jonathan Wynn, a geologist from the University of the South Florida. “Not only is the ice cover removed leaving the surface water exposed to man-made CO2, the surface layer of frigid waters is now fresher, and this means less calcium and carbonate ions are available for organisms.”

CO2 emissions can reach the deep seawater especially in the summers when sea ice in the Arctic declines. The freshwater melted from sea ice dilutes the seawater, further increasing acidity levels and reducing the concentrations of calcium and carbonate, which are the constituents of the mineral aragonite. Aragonite is one of the main minerals which make up the hard part of many marine microorganisms’ skeletons and shells. Species depending on these organisms for food are vastly affected by the reduction of calcium and carbonate concentrations. Ocean acidification models show that with increasing atmospheric CO2, the Arctic Ocean will have crucially low concentrations of dissolved carbonate minerals, like aragonite, in the next decade. Researchers were able to investigate seawater chemistry at high spatial resolution during three years of research cruises in the Arctic, alongside joint US-Canada research efforts aimed at mapping the seafloor as part of the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf programme.
Research shows that acidification in surface waters of the Arctic Ocean is rapidly expanding into areas that were previously isolated from contact with the atmosphere because they were covered with thick ice. Compared with other oceans, the Arctic Ocean has not had the same research attention. “It’s a beautiful but challenging place to work,” said Robert Byrne, a USF marine chemist. Using new automated instruments, scientists were able to make 34,000 waterchemistry measurements from the US Coast Guard icebreaker. “This unusually large data set, in combination with earlier studies, not only documents remarkable changes in Arctic seawater chemistry but also provides a much-needed baseline against which future measurements can be compared.” Byrne credits scientists and engineers at the USF college of Marine Science with developing much of the new technology.”

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Time to switch says lighting expert

Lighting energy cuts should be drastic, argues Philips Lighting boss

Adopting energy-efficient lighting systems in Africa and ME could cut 88 million tonnes of CO2 a year, according to the chairman of Philips Lighting in the Middle East.

 
Philips’ Eduardo Mataix said: “Using energy-efficient lighting in the Middle East and Africa could result in potential savings of AED 62 billion (US $16.9 billion a year);, while globally the savings would be AED 571 billion (US $155.45 billion);.
 
“The Middle East and Africa could prevent 88 million tonnes of CO2 emissions a year, or save 198 million barrels of oil a year by adoption energy-efficient lighting.”
 
Mataix made the comments ahead of the Light Middle East exhibition, which takes place in Dubai from October 31 to November 2. 
 
At the evebt Philips will host an educational forum focusing on lighting solutions.
 
Light Middle East senior show manager Jessica Minton advised: “High standards of insulation, modern household equipment and the use of efficient technology for heating, air-conditioning and lighting are just a few of the methods for reducing energy consumption.
 
“As the key to energy-efficient operations, building automation systems not only optimise and control the various functions but also increase the well-being of users.”
 
Research cited by Philips claimed that close to 13 billion incandescent lamps have been sold worldwide and that by simply switching from incandescent lighting technologies to energy-saving alternatives average energy savings of up to 70% could be made globally, cutting a large percentage off mankinds carbon footprint.

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Lighting cuts should be drastic, says Philips’ boss

Time to switch off traditional bulbs lighting expert says ahead of Dubai exhibition

Adopting energy-efficient lighting systems in Africa and ME could cut 88 million tonnes of CO2 a year, according to the chairman of Philips Lighting in the Middle East.

 
Philips’ Eduardo Mataix said: “Using energy-efficient lighting in the Middle East and Africa could result in potential savings of AED 62 billion (US $16.9 billion a year);, while globally the savings would be AED 571 billion (US $155.45 billion);.
 
”The Middle East and Africa could prevent 88 million tonnes of CO2 emissions a year, or save 198 million barrels of oil a year by adoption energy-efficient lighting.”
 
Mataix made the comments ahead of Dubai exhibition Light Middle East, which takes place in October, where Philips will host an educational forum on lighting solutions.
 
Light Middle East senior show manager Jessica Minton advised: “High standards of insulation, modern household equipment and the use of efficient technology for heating, air-conditioning and lighting are just a few of the methods for reducing energy consumption.
 
“As the key to energy-efficient operations, building automation systems not only optimise and control the various functions but also increase the well-being of users.”
 
Research cited by Philips claimed that close to 13 billion incandescent lamps have been sold worldwide and that by simply switching from incandescent lighting technologies to energy-saving alternatives average energy savings of up to 70% could be made globally, cutting a large percentage off mankinds carbon footprint.

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