Tag Archive | "clean energy"

Exhibitors sign-up for World Future Energy Summit 2014

The world’s leading innovators in clean energy are signing up to exhibit at the 7th World Future Energy Summit, hosted by Masdar, January 20-22 next year as a part of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week.

Organiser of WFES 2014, Reed Exhibitions, has announced that 90% of exhibition space has already been sold for next year’s event, with strong interest in the new Sustainable Living Area that will provide energy and water -efficient solutions for urban living, including a full-size eco-home, eco-transport models, and a fully-functioning hotel room sponsored by Rotana Hotels, and designed and built by Genesis Manazil.

WFES’s show director, Naji El Haddad said: “Investment in renewable energy, particularly within the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region, is growing as more and more governments and private partners commit to large-scale clean energy projects.

“Indeed, the recent WFES insight report into solar energy development in MENA shows the huge potential for developing a large solar industry in the region due to its natural advantages of abundant sunshine and a strong power grid and road network. More importantly, the industry is strongly supported by governments that are committed to the development of clean energy sources to reduce their domestic reliance on fossil fuels.”

Already renowned for showcasing the latest in clean energy technologies, WFES 2014 will once again be the international event that the sustainability industry looks to for new innovations, with exciting new exhibits planned and many exhibitors confirming they will launch breakthrough products.

Next year’s seventh edition of the World Future Energy Summit will be co-located with the second edition of the International Water Summit and the inaugural EcoWASTE exhibition, also hosted by Masdar, at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre, and is the centerpiece of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week from 19-22 January 2014.

 

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Exhibitors sign-up for WFES 2014 amid increasing business opportunities in clean energy

With the search for sustainable energy solutions now topping the agendas of international governments, the world’s leading innovators in clean energy are signing up to exhibit at the 7th World Future Energy Summit (WFES), hosted by Masdar, from January 20-22, 2014 as a part of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week.

Organiser of WFES 2014, Reed Exhibitions, has announced that 90% of exhibition space has already been sold for next year’s event, with strong interest in the new Sustainable Living Area that will provide energy and water-efficient solutions for urban living, including a full-size eco-home, eco-transport models, and a fully-functioning hotel room sponsored by Rotana Hotels, and designed and built by Genesis Manazil.

Frost & Sullivan as an Industry Supporter for WFES 2014 will author an exclusive Whitepaper for the Delegates. The Industry Whitepaper will focus on the future of clean energy, lessons to be learnt from other regions’ experience and also emphasise on the need for a focussed approach to create an environment that can nurture the growth of renewable energy and smart grids in the region.

Already renowned for showcasing the latest in clean energy technologies, WFES 2014 will once again be the international event that the sustainability industry looks to for new innovations, with exciting new exhibits planned and many exhibitors confirming they will launch breakthrough products.

 

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Clean energy investment falls

Global investment in clean energy was US$45.9billion in the third quarter of 2013, down 14% on the second quarter of this year and 20% below the number for Q3 2012, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

This suggests that investment in technologies such as smart grid, efficiency, storage and electric vehicles will end this year below 2012′s US$281 billion. This total was in turn11% down from the record established in 2011.

The third quarter data showed weakness almost across the board, with investment in China, the US and Europe all down on the equivalent period of 2012. The only region to show a rise in activity on both the quarter and the year was the Americas outside the US and Brazil, due to firm figures from Canada, Chile and Uruguay.

However, the installation of solar photovoltaic power capacity worldwide is set to hit a new record in 2013 at 36.7GW.

“After the slightly more promising second quarter, we now have a very disappointing third quarter figure for investment,” said Michael Liebreich, chief executive of Bloomberg New Energy Finance. “US$45.9 billion is still a substantial amount of money, greater than that invested in the whole of 2004, but the loss of momentum since 2011 is worrying.

“The latest setback reflects policy uncertainty in Europe, the lure of cheap gas in the US, a levelling-off in wind and solar investment in China, and a general weakening of political will in major economies. Governments accept that the world has a major problem with climate change but, for the moment, appear too engrossed in short-term domestic issues to take the decisive action needed.”

Among the major countries, the US saw its total fall to US$5.5 billion in Q3 from US$9.4 billion in Q2, China was down at US$13 billion from US$13.8 billion, India was at US$1.2 billion from US$1.5 billion, and Japan US$7.3 billion from US$7.4 billion. Brazil showed a modest rise, from US$950 million to US$1.1 billion.

In Europe, German investment was US$1.6 billion, down from US$1.7 billion in Q2 and far below the quarterly figures seen in recent years. France saw a fall from US$1.2 billion in Q2 to US$727 million in Q3, Italy a rebound to US$1.3 billion from US$1.2 billion, and the UK a somewhat rally from US$1.6 billion to US$2.6 billion.

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Catching the wave

A hydrokinetic ocean wave energy system for the Middle East? Anoop K Menon reports

The big question is how long the Middle East will be able to maintain its status as a low cost energy consumer and major energy exporter,” says Terence L Bolden, CEO of SebaiCMET, a clean energy technology group which is seeking to introduce its wave energy technology in the region. “With the region firmly set on the path of economic and energy diversification, what we are offering is an alternative that sits well with other forms of renewable energy.”
SebaiCMET’s Marine Hydrodynamic Kinetic (MHK) system is a wave power device which harnesses the power of the ocean’s waves to produce clean electricity. Given the UAE’s pioneering role in highlighting the region’s renewable energy potential especially in the realm of solar energy, Bolden feels that the country can set a regional benchmark with wave power as well, competing with the likes of the UK, which is currently leading the wave power technology marketplace. With seven years of testing and four years of development behind it, the MHK system is ready for a full scale commercial pilot. Bolden continues, “I feel the Middle East is the perfect place to test the complete system, either on an island or isolated community so that we ENERGY & WATER 17 August/September 2013 can see the total benefit. Moreover, most of the components can be manufactured locally while assembly and development will definitely be done locally.”

The MHK system basically harnesses energy from the motion of swell waves nine to 18 metres deep; its wings convert the elliptical motion of the waves into linear mechanical motion to drive a magnetic generator which is connected by cable to onshore power grid. “The temperature and viscosity of the water doesn’t really affect the kinetic energy that is produced,” says Lee Marcum, Chief Research & Development Officer at SebaiCMET. “The magnetic generator is housed inside an enclosure custom-made to local conditions. We don’t use any form of hydraulics or moving parts that would create problems for marine life or the ocean environment.” “Since these are mainly composite based systems, we don’t have corrosion and bio-fouling issues that you have with metals,” adds Bolden. The MHK system can be scaled up by coupling the units together to make a complete system or farm depending on the space, the characteristics of the ocean floor where the system is to be installed and the appetite of the local authorities. A standard size unit is approximately 2.5 x 2.5 x 4.5 metres in size and can generate anywhere between 0.25 MW to 1 MW of energy. These systems are located two to five kilometres from the shore on the sea floor. “Wave energy is not intermittent like wind and solar because it is the moon that causes the force to move the waves back and forth underneath,” said Marcum. “The movement of our wings is much consistent, frequent, determinable and efficient.”

Over the past seven years, the company has invested time and money into incorporating safety and risk mitigation features into system design to deal with natural disasters like storms or hurricanes. Bolden said that future generations of the MHK system will be self-anchoring and robotic in terms of how they are operated and deployed on the ocean floor. He was at pains to assure that the technology is environmentally safe and compatible with marine environment. “Marine life tends to congregate near a system that doesn’t threaten life,” he explains. “Our systems don’t have blades or turbines; the interval in the back and forth movement of wings allow fish to move around; we are advised by some of the best coating consultants in the US; we also have no visible pollution as everything including the cabling is below the surface.” What could make SebaiCMET’s wave power technology attractive for countries in the region is its desalination component. Marcum elaborates: “For desalination, the mechanical linkage brings in the sea water, compresses it, sends it through filters and takes the water to the shore. The same kinetic energy is able to produce enough force and pressure to send the filtered water through RO system or to a storage tank from where it can be passed through a filtration system if needed.”
“The other option is to micro-grid this technology which can lower the overall cost tremendously,” says Bolden. “We can make isolated communities independently powered and sustainable.

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